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Eid Al Fitr celebrations through the years

Eid Al Fitr is the three-day festival marking the end of Ramadan. It takes place on the 1st of Shawal, the 10th month of the Islamic calendar. Shaikh Rashid Bin Saeed Al Maktoum offers prayers in this photo from August 1980.Eid prayers consist of a sermon followed by a short congregational prayer. In the Eid prayer, Muslims pronounce the Takbeer, saying, "Allah is greatest, there is no God but Allah and all praise belongs to Allah." People pray in this shot from July 1982.
After the sermon is delivered by the Imam, people supplicate, greet, embrace and congratulate each other. This photo from May 28, 1987 shows prayers taking place in Sharjah.His Highness Shaikh Mohammad Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, receives Eid greetings from the Bohra Community Chief in Dubai's Zabeel Palace in May 1987.During Eid Al Fitr, people wear their best clothes and adorn their homes with lights and decorations. Tailors get busy making Eid dresses in this photo from April 1989.People greet each other by saying "Eid Mubarak", which means "have a happy and blessed Eid". Children play at Dubai's Safa Park during Eid celebrations in this picture from May 1989.The Eid Al Fitr holiday is a time of relaxation and celebration. Parks all over the UAE are typically crowded with people from all walks of life. Sharjah's Al Jazeera Park is pictured here in March 1993.On the day of Eid Al Fitr, people rise early to prepare for the day, eat breakfast and proceed to the place of the Eid congregation. People assemble in Deira just before Eid Al Fitr begins in this photo from March 1994.It is tradition for women to adorn their hands with henna, as this photo from February 1995 demonstrates, and many women purchase new abayas for the three days of the festivities.Eid Al Fitr is a time to be with family and many people make it their priority to spend time with their relatives. Most families join together over meals, and often go out on trips together, like this photo of Dubai Zoo from March 1995.After celebrating the occasion with family members, many people then meet with friends, often choosing to go on a trip to another emirate with loved ones. Here, a shop in Dubai sells cards for Eid in this snap from February 1996.As the holy month draws to a close, Muslims are obligated to share their blessings by feeding the poor and making contributions to mosques.Many places in the UAE offer fireworks displays and Eid celebrations are arranged at work or in social settings. This picture is from February 1997.During the day, people visit each other and children receive gifts. People give treats to children, as well as money or "eidi". Children go shopping for new toys during the occasion in this picture from January 1998.Each year, Islamic scientists around the world try to sight the new moon to determine the date of Eid Al Fitr, as it falls the day after the new moon. His Highness Dr. Shaikh Sultan bin Mohammad Al Qasimi, Supreme Council Member and Ruler of Sharjah, joins with other shaikhs to pray in this photo from January 1998.With a large expat community, many Muslims in the UAE do not have the luxury of spending Eid with their families, however, some diplomatic missions help fill in the void by holding their own special Eid celebrations.Eid Al Fitr goes back to the time of the Prophet Mohammad (PBUH) when the angel Gabriel descended with white clothes for each of the Prophet's grandsons. Here people shop for new clothes in January 1998.Though the story may slightly vary between sects, Muslims believe that during the month of Ramadan, Allah revealed the first verses of the Quran, the holy book of Islam, to Prophet Mohammad (PBUH). Children play as part of Eid celebrations at Dubai's Creek Park in January 1998.Before the first day of Eid Al Fitr, Muslims donate to the underprivileged in the form of food and clothes to ensure that they too can have a joyous Eid. This donation is known as Sadaqah Al Fitr. Prayers take place in Dubai in this photo from January 1999.

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